GOBBLE, GOBBLE, THANKSGIVING EDITION Vol. 1 No. 57


Gobble, gobble, Happy Thanksgiving and happy holidays to you all. ‘Tis the season of overindulgence with the end effect of becoming an overfed slugabed or layabout.

Fellow travelers, are you one of the millions sitting at your desk or walking around with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and are not even aware of it? Overdoing food and alcohol during this holiday season could make the condition worse leading straight to a heart disease and/or liver failure.

Dr. Howard Monsour, chief of hepatology at Houston Methodist Hospital
Dr. Howard Monsour, chief of hepatology at Houston Methodist Hospital.

“Data has shown that nearly 30 million Americans have NAFLD. Many times it is missed until the person’s liver enzyme levels are high,” said Dr. Howard Monsour, chief of hepatology at Houston Methodist Hospital. “Patients can die from a heart attack or cirrhosis of the liver. It’s a serious condition that we have to get under control quickly in this country.” (Kovacik, 2015)

livThe nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is an accumulation of fat deposits inside the liver cells. Alcohol, drugs, obesity, lipid disorders and diabetes can all contribute to this disease. Moreover, many individuals with this condition suffer from Metabolic Syndrome, a group of factors, which include a large waist size (men greater than 40 inches, women greater than 35 inches), high blood pressure, high triglyceride levels, and insulin resistance that heighten the risk of heart attack, stroke, and type 2 diabetes.

Over a period, an individual could experience fatigue, weakness, and loss of appetite. Some individuals may develop pain in the center or right upper part of the belly. The symptoms might get worse after heavy drinking.

“However, much like type 2 diabetes, NAFLD can be cured with proper diet and exercise,” Monsour said. “If you lose 12 percent of your current weight, no matter how much you weigh, you can eliminate fat from your liver.” (Kovacik, 2015)

Dr. Monsour continues by saying that hearty exercise: as weight lifting, swimming, running or aerobics, between 75 and 150 minutes a week with a high rate of 120 or above during the holiday season and beyond will help with this problem. He also suggests that eating fruits and vegetables as a snack before attending a family function or holiday party will help you feel full and just might keep you away from foods high in fat.

fatty-liver-cirrhosisIt should be noted that between five and 20% of people with fatty liver would develop serious liver disease. Whether or not one develops cirrhosis, fibrosis or liver cancer depends on whether the person has inflammation in the liver caused by the fat resulting in an inflammatory response called steatohepatitis. Many times but not always, this causes an increase in liver enzymes on routine blood tests.

“The key is to catch it early and man times it may not be discovered until a routine checkup,” Monsour said. “If you start to experience symptoms, see a doctor as soon as you can. Letting it go without evaluation can lead to a very difficult, unhealthy life.”

Dear readers, if you have read this far, the Captain would be most heartened if you would rate this and future articles and/or leave a comment at the top of the blog posts whether positive or negative. In this way, “The Fat Bastard Gazette” may better serve you and our entire readership.

 

 

Kovacik, G. (2015, November 16). People Unaware of Fatty Liver Disease Could Make the Problem Worse with Holiday Overindulgence. Retrieved November 16, 2015, from HUSTON Methodist LEADING MEDICINE: http://www.newswise.com/articles/people-unaware-of-fatty-liver-disease-could-make-the-problem-worse-with-holiday-overindulgence

 


 

 

Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon
Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner, and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon with Sam Borsalino, Assistant Publisher

Dear Hail-Fellows well met, “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is written and edited by your favorite curmudgeons Captain Hank Quinlan and

Flatfoot Willie, Corespondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers
Flatfoot Willie, Correspondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers

Staff (monkeys in the back room). We offer an ongoing tirade to support or offend anyone of any large dimension, cultural background, religious affiliation, or color of skin. This gazette rails against an eclectic mix of circus ring ne’er do wells, big ring fatty and fatso whiners, congenital idiots, the usual motley assortment of the profoundly dumbfounded, and a favorite of intelligent men everywhere, the

May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity .
May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity.

“Great Booboisie.” Nor shall we ignore the wide assortment of shirkers, layabouts, and slugabeds.

Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.
Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.

All this and more always keeping our major focus on “Why so fat?”  Enough said? We at “The Fat Bastard Gazette” think so. If you like what you read, and you know whom you are, in this yellow blog, tell your friends. We would be elated with an ever-wider readership. We remain cordially yours, Captain Hank Quinlan and the Monkeys in the back room

“The Fat Bastard Gazette” does not purport to offer any definitive medical or pharmaceutical advice whatsoever in any explicit or implied manner. Always consult a qualified physician in all medical or pharmaceutical matters. “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is only the opinion of informed nonprofessionals for the general edification and entertainment of the greater public. 

No similarities to any existing names or characters are expressed or implied. We reserve the right to offend or support anybody, anything, or any sacred totem across the globe.

MORE EVIDENCE FOR GREATLY REDUCING SATURATED FAT IN YOUR DIET! VOL. 1 NO. 56


 

 Severe hypertriglyceridemia in human blood (triglyceride levels greater than 500 mg per dL [5.65 mmol per L])1 may manifest as a grossly lipemic serum sample when levels exceed 1,000 mg per dL (11.30 mmol per L).
Severe hypertriglyceridemia in human blood (triglyceride levels greater than 500 mg per dL [5.65 mmol per L])1 may manifest as a grossly lipemic serum sample when levels exceed 1,000 mg per dL (11.30 mmol per L).

“High levels of saturated fat in the blood could make an individual more prone to inflammation and tissue damage, a new study suggests.” (Mendoza, 2015)

Eating saturated fat with gay abandon has been called into question once again. New research states that excessive ingestion of saturated fat is not good for us.

“Scientists from Imperial College London studied mice that have an unusually high level of saturated fat circulating in their blood. The research, published 3 September 2015 in Cell Reports shows that the presence of saturated fats resulted in monocytes – a type of white blood cell (Any of various large white blood cells that are formed in the bone marrow, circulate in the blood, and destroy pathogenic bacteria by phagocytosis. Monocytes develop into macrophages in various body tissues.) – migrating into the tissues of vital organs.” (Mendoza, 2015)

The researchers think that the migrating monocytes could increase tissue damage due to the fact they may exacerbate ongoing underlying inflammation, this aspect is still under study.

Dr. Woollard from the Department of Medicine at Imperial College London
Dr. Woollard from the Department of Medicine at Imperial College London

Lead researcher Dr. Kevin Woollard said: “The mice we studied were treated with a drug that caused them to accumulate extremely high levels of fat in their blood. Although it is unusual, humans do sometimes have measurements approaching those levels, either from an inherited condition or through eating fatty foods.”

“Modern lifestyles seem to go hand-in-hand with high levels of fat in the blood. This fat comes from the food and drinks that we consume; for example, you’d be surprised how much saturated fat a latte contains, and some people drink several through the course of the day.”

“We think that maintaining a relatively high concentration of saturated fats for example by constantly snacking on cakes, biscuits, and pastries could be causing monocytes to migrate out of the blood and into surrounding tissues.”

“Blood is very finely balanced, and the exchange of cells and other substances with the surrounding tissue is part of maintaining that balance.” (Mendoza, 2015)

Professor Marina Botto from the Department of Medicine at Imperial College London
Professor Marina Botto from the Department of Medicine at Imperial College London

The team, led by Dr. Woollard and Professor Marina Botto from the Department of Medicine at Imperial College London, has noticed that as the organs absorb fats, most of the relocated monocytes are turned into another type of immune cell call the macrophage. Some of the cells located within the tissues monoawesometake in fat and are turned into foam cells (Foam cells are fat-laden macrophages seen in atherosclerosis. They are an indication of plaque build-up or atherosclerosis.) These foam cells and macrophages spur on the production of a signaling molecule called CCL 4, which attracts more monocytes into the tissue. This closed loop continues increasing output of foam cells in macrophages as long as the level of saturated fat is elevated.

These mechanisms of action “may have evolved to remove fats from the blood in order to maintain a healthy balance; further research is required to confirm this.” (Mendoza, 2015)

A key element of these observations, however, is that the monocytes involved in this process are of one very specific type.

Dr. Woollard said, “It’s really exciting to see that the monocytes that migrate into tissues are all of one type and that means we actually may be able to develop drugs that change this behavior.”

nrneph.2012.41-f1
Click to enlarge

Individuals at risk of cardiovascular disease or obese individuals could be treated with a drug that targets these particular monocytes preventing the possible future damage caused by fatty buildup in blood vessels in organs.

“Interestingly, people with certain immune disorders affecting monocytes, including some inflammatory and autoimmune diseases like lupus, can have unexpectedly high levels of saturated fats in their blood and also are more likely to suffer heart attacks  and strokes  at a younger age.”

“The next stages of this research will be to study groups of patients with inflammatory diseases, and to look at the direct effects of saturated foods on monocyte function.” (Mendoza, 2015)

Dear readers, if you have read this far, the Captain would be most heartened if you would rate this and future articles and/or leave a comment at the top of the blog posts whether positive or negative. In this way, “The Fat Bastard Gazette” may better serve you and our entire readership.

 


Mendoza, N. W. (2015, September 03). Health risks of saturated fats aggravated by immune response. Retrieved September 06, 2015, from Imperial College London News: http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/newsandeventspggrp/imperialcollege/newssummary/news_3-9-2015-17-8-27

 

Saja et al (2015), “Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins Modulate the Distribution and Extravasation of Ly6C/Gr1low Monocytes,” Cell Reports, doi:10.1016/j.celrep.2015.08.020

 

 

Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon
Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner, and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon with Sam Borsalino, Assistant Publisher

Dear Hail-Fellows well met, “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is written and edited by your favorite curmudgeons Captain Hank Quinlan and

Flatfoot Willie, Corespondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers
Flatfoot Willie, Correspondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers

Staff (monkeys in the back room). We offer an ongoing tirade to support or offend anyone of any large dimension, cultural background, religious affiliation, or color of skin. This gazette rails against an eclectic mix of circus ring ne’er do wells, big ring fatty and fatso whiners, congenital idiots, the usual motley assortment of the profoundly dumbfounded, and a favorite of intelligent men everywhere, the

May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity .
May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity.

“Great Booboisie.” Nor shall we ignore the wide assortment of shirkers, layabouts, and slugabeds.

Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.
Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.

All this and more always keeping our major focus on “Why so fat?”  Enough said? We at “The Fat Bastard Gazette” think so. If you like what you read, and you know whom you are, in this yellow blog, tell your friends. We would be elated with an ever-wider readership. We remain cordially yours, Captain Hank Quinlan and the Monkeys in the back room

“The Fat Bastard Gazette” does not purport to offer any definitive medical or pharmaceutical advice whatsoever in any explicit or implied manner. Always consult a qualified physician in all medical or pharmaceutical matters. “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is only the opinion of informed nonprofessionals for the general edification and entertainment of the greater public. 

No similarities to any existing names or characters are expressed or implied. We reserve the right to offend or support anybody, anything, or any sacred totem across the globe.

SUSTAINED CALORIE RESTRICTION IS SHOWN TO INCREASE LIFESPAN! VOL.1 NO. 55


NIH Clinical Center aerial photograph
NIH Clinical Center aerial photograph

A National Institutes of Health (NIH) supporting study provides some of the first insights into the effects of sustained calorie restriction in adults. Results from a two-year clinical trial show calorie restriction in average weight and moderately overweight people failed to enhance the metabolic effects found in laboratory animal studies.”However, researchers found calorie restriction modified risk factors for age-related diseases and influenced indicators associated with longer lifespan, such as blood pressure, cholesterol, and insulin resistance.” (NIH study finds calorie restriction lower some risk factors for age-related diseases, 2015) This study was written in the September 2015 issue of the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences.

Calorie restriction is a reduction in calorie intake without loss of essential nutrients. It is shown to increase lifespan and retard the progression of numerous age-related diseases in multiple animal studies. Called Comprehensive Assessment of Long-Term Effects of Reducing Intake of Energy (CALERIE), the randomized trial was funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the National Institute  of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases, both part of NIH. It was conducted at Washington University in St. Louis, Louisiana State University’s Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, and Tufts University in Boston. The study coordinating center was at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina.

NIA Director Richard J. Hodes, M.D.
NIA Director Richard J. Hodes, M.D.

“The study found that this calorie restriction intervention did not produce significant effects on the pre-specified primary metabolic endpoints, but it did modify several risk factors for age-related diseases. It is encouraging to find positive effects when we test interventions that might affect diseases and declines associated with advancing age,” notes NIA Director Richard J. Hodes, M.D. “However, we need to learn much more about the health consequences of this type of intervention in healthy people before considering dietary recommendations. In the meantime, we do know that exercise and maintaining a healthy weight and diet can contribute to healthy aging.”

In laboratory animals, calorie restriction’s salubrious effects on life expectancy have generally been found when it is begun in youth or early middle age. An equivalent trial in humans would take decades. “However, shorter trials can determine feasibility, safety and effects on quality of life, disease risk factors, predictors of lifespan and effects on mechanisms influenced by calorie restriction in laboratory animal studies. CALERIE was a two-year randomized controlled trial in 218 young and middle-aged healthy normal-weight and moderately overweight men and women to measure these outcomes in a CR (Calorie Restriction) group, compared with a control group who maintained their regular diets.” (NIH study finds calorie restriction lower some risk factors for age-related diseases, 2015)

slankekurThe CR participants were given weight goals of 15.5% weight-loss in the first year, followed by weight stabilization over the second year. This goal was the weight-loss expected to be accomplished by reducing calorie consumption 25% below one’s regular intake at the start of the study. The calorie restriction group lost an average of 10% of their body weight in the first year, maintaining this weight the second year. Weight-loss fell short of the goal, but it is the greatest sustained weight-loss reported in any dietary trial in non-obese people. The CR participants achieved substantially less calorie restriction (12%) than the trials 25% target while maintaining calorie restriction all over the entire two-year period. The control group’s weight in calorie consumption was stable over the same period.

“This study was designed to test the effects of calorie restriction on resting metabolic rate (adjusted for weight-loss) and body temperature, which are diminished in many laboratory animal studies and have been proposed to contribute to its effects on longevity. The study found a temporary effect on resting metabolic rate, which was not significant at the end of the study, and no effect on body temperature.” (NIH study finds calorie restriction lower some risk factors for age-related diseases, 2015)

Even though the expected metabolic effects were not found, calorie restriction greatly lowered “several indicators of cardiovascular disease compared to the control group, decreasing average blood pressure by 4% and total cholesterol by 6%. Levels of high-density lipoprotein (good) cholesterol were increased. Calorie restriction caused a 47% reduction in levels of C-reactive protein, an inflammatory factor linked to cardiovascular disease. It also greatly decreased insulin resistance, which is an indicator of diabetes risk. T3, the marker of thyroid hormone activity, decreased in the calorie restriction group by more than 20 percent, while remaining within the normal range. This is of interest since some studies suggest that lower thyroid activity may be associated with longer lifespan.” (NIH study finds calorie restriction lower some risk factors for age-related diseases, 2015)

This study also evaluated calorie restrictions effects on mood (specifically hunger-related symptoms) and found no deleterious effects. However, a few in the study developed transient anemia and greater than normal decreases in bone density given their degree of weight-loss.

Evan Hadley, M.D., director of NIA’s Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology
Evan Hadley, M.D., director of NIA’s Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology

“The CALERIE results are quite intriguing. They show that this degree of sustained calorie restriction can influence disease risk factors and possible predictors of longevity in healthy, non-obese people. It will be important to learn how calorie restriction at this level affects these factors despite the lack of the predicted metabolic effects,” said Evan Hadley, M.D., director of NIA’s Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology and an author of the paper. “Since this group already had low-risk factor levels at the start of the study, it’s important to find out whether these further reductions would yield additional long-term benefits. It also would be useful to discover if calorie restriction over longer periods has additional effects on predictors of health in old age and compare its effects with exercise-induced weight loss.”

Dear readers, if you have read this far, the Captain would be most heartened if you would rate this and future articles and/or leave a comment at the top of the blog posts whether positive or negative. In this way, “The Fat Bastard Gazette” may better serve you and our entire readership.


NIH study finds calorie restriction lower some risk factors for age-related diseases. (2015, September 1). Retrieved September 1, 2015, from National Institutes of Health: http://www.nih.gov/news/health/sep2015/nia-01.htm#top

Ravussin, E., et al., A 2-Year Randomized Controlled Trial of Human Caloric Restriction: Feasibility and Effects on Predictors of Health Span and Longevity. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci (2015) 70 (9): 1097-1104. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv057.

 

 

Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon
Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner, and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon with Sam Borsalino, Assistant Publisher

Dear Hail-Fellows well met, “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is written and edited by your favorite curmudgeons Captain Hank Quinlan and

Flatfoot Willie, Corespondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers
Flatfoot Willie, Correspondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers

Staff (monkeys in the back room). We offer an ongoing tirade to support or offend anyone of any large dimension, cultural background, religious affiliation, or color of skin. This gazette rails against an eclectic mix of circus ring ne’er do wells, big ring fatty and fatso whiners, congenital idiots, the usual motley assortment of the profoundly dumbfounded, and a favorite of intelligent men everywhere, the

May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity .
May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity.

“Great Booboisie.” Nor shall we ignore the wide assortment of shirkers, layabouts, and slugabeds.

Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.
Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.

All this and more always keeping our major focus on “Why so fat?”  Enough said? We at “The Fat Bastard Gazette” think so. If you like what you read, and you know whom you are, in this yellow blog, tell your friends. We would be elated with an ever-wider readership. We remain cordially yours, Captain Hank Quinlan and the Monkeys in the back room

“The Fat Bastard Gazette” does not purport to offer any definitive medical or pharmaceutical advice whatsoever in any explicit or implied manner. Always consult a qualified physician in all medical or pharmaceutical matters. “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is only the opinion of informed nonprofessionals for the general edification and entertainment of the greater public. 

No similarities to any existing names or characters are expressed or implied. We reserve the right to offend or support anybody, anything, or any sacred totem across the globe.

LARD BUCKETS, A SMALL GLIMMER OF HOPE! Vol. 1 No. 54


hqdefault
Whopper with 1050 bacon strips

Diets high in fish oil as opposed to diets high in lard (e.g., bacon) make for dissimilar bacteria in the guts of mice, according to an article published in Cell Metabolism. Researchers transferred these different microbes into other mice to understand better how they affected health. The findings suggest that gut bacteria share some of the responsibility for the healthful effects of fish oil and the unhealthful effects of lard.

Specifically, the mice that received gut microbes associated with the fish oil diet gained resistance against diet-induced weight gain and inflammation compared with mice given gut microbes associated with and a lard diet. The shows that gut microbes are a separate factor aggravating inflammation associated with diet-induced obesity. It gives pause as a probiotic might help counteract a lard-laden diet.

picture of Robert Caesar of the University of Gothenburg
Robert Caesar

“We wanted to determine whether good microbes directly contribute to the metabolic differences associated with diets rich in healthy and unhealthy fats,” states first study author Robert Caesar of the University of Gothenburg. Even though the study deals with mice, “our goal is to identify interventions for optimizing metabolic health in humans.” 2

Fredrik Backhed
Fredrick Bäckhed

Caesar, conducting the experiment in the lab of senior study author Fredrick Bäckhed, started by feeding either lard or fish oil to mice for 11 weeks monitoring signs of metabolic health. The ingestion of lard encouraged the growth of bacteria called Bilophila, which have been linked to gut

Photo of Bilophila
Photo of Bilophila

inflammation, while the fish oil diet increased the number of bacteria called Akkermansia muciniphila, known to reduce weight gain and improve glucose

Photo of Akkermansia muciniphila
Photo of Akkermansia muciniphila

metabolism in mice. Both of these bacteria are found in humans as well.

“We were surprised that the lard and the fish oil diet, despite having the same energy content and the same amount of dietary fiber–which is the primary energy source for the gut bacteria–resulted in fundamentally different gut microbiota communities and that the microbiota per se had such large effects on health,” Caesar says. 2

Cesar then conducted fecal transplants to see if fish oil diet microbes “could improve the health of mice fed only lard and vice versa.” 2  Results provide additional proof that gut microbes can both determine and reverse health problems caused by eating unhealthful diet.

“Our paper supports previous reports indicating the bacteria Akkermansia muciniphila is a promoter of a healthy phenotype,” Bäckhed says. “However, further investigations will be needed to determine if this bacteria can be used as probiotic strain and, in that case, how it should be combined with diet to optimize health outcomes.” 2    

Dear readers, if you have read this far, the Captain would be most heartened if you would rate this and future articles and/or leave a comment at the top of the blog posts whether positive or negative. In this way, “The Fat Bastard Gazette” may better serve you and our entire readership.


  1. Cell Metabolism, Caesar et al.: “Crosstalk between Gut Microbiota and Dietary Lipids Aggravates WAT Inflammation through TLR Signaling ” doi:10.1016/j.cmet.2015.07.026

           Cell Press 

  1. SVAHN, K. (2015, 8 27). Fish Oil-Diet Benefits May be Mediated by Gut Microbes. Retrieved 8 28, 2015, from UNIVERSITY OF GOTHENBURG: http://www.gu.se/english/about_the_university/news-calendar/News_detail//fish-oil-diet-benefits-may-be-mediated-by-gut-microbes.cid1316367
  2. Press, C. (2015, August 28). “Fish oil-diet benefits may be mediated by gut microbes.” Medical News Today. Retrieved from
    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/298738.php.

 

 

Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon
Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner, and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon with Sam Borsalino, Assistant Publisher

Dear Hail-Fellows well met, “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is written and edited by your favorite curmudgeons Captain Hank Quinlan and

Flatfoot Willie, Corespondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers
Flatfoot Willie, Correspondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers

Staff (monkeys in the back room). We offer an ongoing tirade to support or offend anyone of any large dimension, cultural background, religious affiliation, or color of skin. This gazette rails against an eclectic mix of circus ring ne’er do wells, big ring fatty and fatso whiners, congenital idiots, the usual motley assortment of the profoundly dumbfounded, and a favorite of intelligent men everywhere, the

May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity .
May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity.

“Great Booboisie.” Nor shall we ignore the wide assortment of shirkers, layabouts, and slugabeds.

Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.
Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.

All this and more always keeping our major focus on “Why so fat?”  Enough said? We at “The Fat Bastard Gazette” think so. If you like what you read, and you know whom you are, in this yellow blog, tell your friends. We would be elated with an ever-wider readership. We remain cordially yours, Captain Hank Quinlan and the Monkeys in the back room

“The Fat Bastard Gazette” does not purport to offer any definitive medical or pharmaceutical advice whatsoever in any explicit or implied manner. Always consult a qualified physician in all medical or pharmaceutical matters. “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is only the opinion of informed nonprofessionals for the general edification and entertainment of the greater public. 

No similarities to any existing names or characters are expressed or implied. We reserve the right to offend or support anybody, anything, or any sacred totem across the globe.