NEW FINDING FOR BROWN ADIPOSE TISSUE! Vol. 1 No. 66


fat_002Analysis of diabetes and obesity has made great progress of late. One of the most encouraging findings is related to the mechanism of action of BAT, brown adipose tissue comprised of brown adipose cells, which contain brown adipocytes. BAT has been shown to be a primary site for lipid breakdown in glucose uptake. The heat producing capacity of even discreet amounts of brown adipocytes is of interest as the target for diabetes and obesity therapies.

The past four years, the European Union backed DIABAT (Recruitment and activation of brown adipocytes as preventative and curative therapies) project team has worked to develop novel, energy consuming, BAT centered therapies for people at risk and patients with type 2 diabetes.

Advancing BAT understanding toward the development of new strategies and therapies, DIABAT investigated the differentiation (the process by which cells or tissues change from relatively generalized to specialized kinds, during development), function, dysfunction, and physiological regulation of brown adipocytes. Researchers incorporated experimental cellular systems, animal models, and studies on human volunteers using the BAT imaging methods for noninvasive functional analysis. In short, the experimental findings are now ready for clinical utilization.

Dr Tobias Schafmeier
Dr. Tobias Schafmeier

As DIABAT drew to a final close, project coordinator Dr. Tobias Schafmeier from the German Cancer Research Center took some time out to speak about the impressive advances achieved. “In the past four years, the DIABAT consortium has made huge progress towards understanding the in vivo (occurring or made to occur within a living organism or natural setting) activation of BAT. Endogenous (growing or developing from within; originating within), nutritional, and artificial compounds and has revealed important underlying biological mechanisms. Furthermore, better imaging technology has gained opportunities for functional analysis of BAT in humans and improved BAT-associated diagnostics.” (Understanding the activation of BAT for improved diabetes treatment, 2015)

Discussion continues concerning the calculable contribution of BAT to overall energy consumption in humans. In spite of these reservations, the research carried out by DIABAT showed that even in situations where energy consumption was not significantly increased, the functioning of an organism possibly improves upon BAT activation. Dr. Schafmeier comments, “This observation can be explained by the fact that BAT may act as a sink for glucose and lipids thereby ameliorating elevated serum levels of these nutrients in obese conditions. Furthermore, BAT apparently has an endocrine function with an impact on remote tissues as it secretes bioactive substances (BATokines) into the circulation.” (Understanding the activation of BAT for improved diabetes treatment, 2015)

The results of DIABAT project will primarily be of interest researchers. However, Dr. Schafmeier states, “The findings are also relevant for physicians due to improved BAT imaging that has been developed during the project. Additionally, the project results probably will have a high impact for nutritionists and manufacturers of dietary supplements, exemplified by the identification of novel nutritional compounds that have the potential to induce white adipose tissue browning.” (Understanding the activation of BAT for improved diabetes treatment, 2015)

530-Fatties-Facebook-Page-Accused-Of-Fat-Shaming-Overweight-People-In-CaliforniaIn the end, patients with obesity-associated metabolic dysfunction and type 2 diabetes will gain the most from DIABAT’s efforts. Dr. Schafmeier goes on to say, “Given the improvements in BAT imaging that have been made by the consortium, subjects could now be more efficiently stratified according to their amount of BAT, and targeted therapies could be pursued at least in BAT-positive individuals. Food supplements that have been characterized in the project have the potential to improve whole-body metabolism by inducing/activating BAT.” (Understanding the activation of BAT for improved diabetes treatment, 2015)

Dear readers, if you have read this far, the Captain would be most heartened if you would rate this and future articles and/or leave a comment at the top of the blog posts whether positive or negative. In this way, “The Fat Bastard Gazette” may better serve you and our entire readership.

 

 

 

RECRUITMENT AND ACTIVATION OF BROWN ADIPOCYTES AS PREVENTIVE AND CURATIVE THERAPY FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES. (2015, October 21). Retrieved from DIABAT: http://www.diabat.org/content/index_eng.html

Understanding the activation of BAT for improved diabetes treatment. (2015, October 20th). Retrieved October 21, 2015, from Medical press: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-10-diabetes-treatment.html?utm_source=nwletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=ctgr-item&utm_campaign=daily-nwletter

 

 

 

Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon
Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner, and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon with Sam Borsalino, Assistant Publisher

Dear Hail-Fellows well met, “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is written and edited by your favorite curmudgeons Captain Hank Quinlan and

Flatfoot Willie, Corespondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers
Flatfoot Willie, Correspondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers

Staff (monkeys in the back room). We offer an ongoing tirade to support or offend anyone of any large dimension, cultural background, religious affiliation, or color of skin. This gazette rails against an eclectic mix of circus ring ne’er do wells, big ring fatty and fatso whiners, congenital idiots, the usual motley assortment of the profoundly dumbfounded, and a favorite of intelligent men everywhere, the

May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity .
May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity.

“Great Booboisie.” Nor shall we ignore the wide assortment of shirkers, layabouts, and slugabeds.

Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.
Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.

All this and more always keeping our major focus on “Why so fat?”  Enough said? We at “The Fat Bastard Gazette” think so. If you like what you read, and you know whom you are, in this yellow blog, tell your friends. We would be elated with an ever-wider readership. We remain cordially yours, Captain Hank Quinlan and the Monkeys in the back room

“The Fat Bastard Gazette” does not purport to offer any definitive medical or pharmaceutical advice whatsoever in any explicit or implied manner. Always consult a qualified physician in all medical or pharmaceutical matters. “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is only the opinion of informed nonprofessionals for the general edification and entertainment of the greater public. 

No similarities to any existing names or characters are expressed or implied. We reserve the right to offend or support anybody, anything, or any sacred totem across the globe.

THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A FASTING DIET AND NOT JUST WATER Vol. 1 No. 65


Waiting for dinner. White background.

Dietary restriction as demonstrated by various animal models shows many health benefits. Fasting as understood by the majority of people is the consumption of water only, an extreme form of restriction. Studies in animals and people suggest repeated cycles of fasting may strengthen certain metabolic and immune functions. However, fasting for two or more days is difficult and can have untoward health effects.

Dr. Valter D. Longo Dietmar-photo
Dr. Valter D. Longo Ph.D., USC Davis School of Gerontology, Edna Jones Professor in Gerontology and Professor in Biological Science. Dietmar-photo

Researchers led by Dr. Valter Longo at the University of Southern California examined diets incorporating “the beneficial effects of fasting while minimizing the risks and difficulty associated with complete food restriction. The research was funded in part by NIH’s National Institute on Aging (NIA). Results were published in Cell Metabolism on July 7, 2015.” (Torgan, 2015)

Longo et al. initially tested cycles of extended fasting in yeast. It was noted that yeast cycled back and forth from a nutrient rich environment to water “had a longer lifespan and were better able to survive toxin exposure—a marker of increased stress resistance—than yeast not exposed to periodic starvation.” (Torgan, 2015)

Researchers then tested a very low calorie, low protein diet in mice. The diet structured to copy some of the healthful effects of fasting, including improving markers of longevity in metabolism. “Middle-aged mice (16 months old) were fed the diet for 4 consecutive days, followed by 10 days of unlimited access to food. The mice overate during these phases so that their overall calorie intake was similar to mice continuously fed a regular diet.” (Torgan, 2015)

These mice fed the diet twice a month continuing for several months experienced various metabolic changes, including lower blood glucose and insulin levels, then mice fed the control diet. The metabolic markers reverted to baseline levels during cycles of refeeding. “Mice fed the diet had less fat around their organs (known as deep or visceral fat) at 28 months of age. They also had a greater bone density at old age and increased nerve cell development in the brain. At the end of life, mice on the diet had fewer tumors and skin lesions than control mice.” (Torgan, 2015)

fasting dietFinally, a pilot study was administered on a small group of people. “Nineteen healthy adults consumed a proprietary plant-based diet that provided between 34% and 54% of the normal caloric intake with at least 9–10% protein, 34–47% carbohydrate, and 44–56% fat. Participants consumed the diet 5 days a month for 3 months (3 cycles), resuming their normal diet at the end of each diet period. A control group of 19 adults ate a normal diet.” (Torgan, 2015)

Again, people on the diet showed improvements in blood glucose and decreased body weight compared to the control group. Individuals with elevated C- reactive protein levels (a marker of heart disease risk) had decreased levels; individuals with normal levels had no change. Some side effects were noted by individuals on the diet is especially the T, weakness, and headache.

article-2317699-02C14BF100000578-711_634x613“Strict fasting is hard for people to stick to, and it can also be dangerous, so we developed a complex diet that triggers the same effects in the body,” Longo says. “It’s not a typical diet because it isn’t something you need to stay on.”Longo went on to say, “I’ve personally tried both, and the fasting mimicking diet is a lot easier and also a lot safer.”  (Perkins, 2015)

Although the diet has many positive aspects, Dr. Longo raised a caution flag against water only fasting and warned that the fast mimicking diet should not be attempted without first consulting a MD. and remaining under their guidance  throughout the dieting  process.

“Not everyone is healthy enough to fast for five days, and the health consequences can be severe for a few who do it improperly,” Longo said. “Water-only fasting should only be done in a specialized clinic. Also, certain types of very low-calorie diets, and particularly those with high protein content, can increase the incidence of gallstones in women at risk.” (Perkins, 2015)

“In contrast,” he added, “the fasting mimicking diet tested in the trial can be done anywhere under the supervision of a physician and carefully following the guidelines established in the clinical trials.” (Perkins, 2015)

More research with a larger study group is needed to resolve the long-term effects of this particular diet on human health and offer information on when and how such a diet might be applied.

Dear readers, if you have read this far, the Captain would be most heartened if you would rate this and future articles and/or leave a comment at the top of the blog posts whether positive or negative. In this way, “The Fat Bastard Gazette” may better serve you and our entire readership.


 

Perkins, R. (2015, June 18). Diet that mimics fasting appears to slow aging. Retrieved October 19, 2015, from USC News: https://news.usc.edu/82959/diet-that-mimics-fasting-appears-to-slow-aging/

Torgan, C. (2015, July 13). Health Effects of a Diet that Mimics Fasting. Retrieved October 19, 2015, from NIH RESEARCH MATTERS: http://www.nih.gov/researchmatters/july2015/07132015fasting.htm

 

 

Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon
Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner, and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon with Sam Borsalino, Assistant Publisher

Dear Hail-Fellows well met, “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is written and edited by your favorite curmudgeons Captain Hank Quinlan and

Flatfoot Willie, Corespondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers
Flatfoot Willie, Correspondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers

Staff (monkeys in the back room). We offer an ongoing tirade to support or offend anyone of any large dimension, cultural background, religious affiliation, or color of skin. This gazette rails against an eclectic mix of circus ring ne’er do wells, big ring fatty and fatso whiners, congenital idiots, the usual motley assortment of the profoundly dumbfounded, and a favorite of intelligent men everywhere, the

May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity .
May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity.

“Great Booboisie.” Nor shall we ignore the wide assortment of shirkers, layabouts, and slugabeds.

Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.
Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.

All this and more always keeping our major focus on “Why so fat?”  Enough said? We at “The Fat Bastard Gazette” think so. If you like what you read, and you know whom you are, in this yellow blog, tell your friends. We would be elated with an ever-wider readership. We remain cordially yours, Captain Hank Quinlan and the Monkeys in the back room

“The Fat Bastard Gazette” does not purport to offer any definitive medical or pharmaceutical advice whatsoever in any explicit or implied manner. Always consult a qualified physician in all medical or pharmaceutical matters. “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is only the opinion of informed nonprofessionals for the general edification and entertainment of the greater public. 

No similarities to any existing names or characters are expressed or implied. We reserve the right to offend or support anybody, anything, or any sacred totem across the globe.

NO SLEEP EQUALS TOO MUCH WEIGHT: NOT A GOOD COMBINATION! Vol. 1 No. 64


Tired Businessman With CoffeeYou were up all night to meet a deadline for work or because of the restless night. It is now time for a shower and a shave then out the door. First, stop Starbucks. However, today is a bit different. Today you are compelled to stop at a fast food drive through and get one or two of their breakfast specials or a few apple curlers, which are loaded with calories you would not normally eat.

If this is you, read on.

Gerald E. McGinnis Professor of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School Senior Physician, Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital
Gerald E. McGinnis Professor of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Senior Physician, Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

According to Dr. Stuart Quan, MD, “The amount of sleep Americans say they get every night has declined from an average of approximately 8.5 hours in the 1960s to slightly less than 7 hours today. There are probably lots of reasons why, but they likely include 24/7 occupations, prolongation of the “day” with artificial lighting, the use of electronic devices at bedtime (blue-wavelength light from these devices delays sleep onset), and the widespread belief that sleep is less of a priority compared to other activities, whether they are work- or pleasure-related.”

Besides sleeping less, we also tend to weigh more as well. Greater than 30% of adult Americans are obese; this is in comparison to less than 15% of adults in the 1960s. This obesity epidemic has also spread to children; around 17% are considered obese. This is an unsettling trend because obese children are prone to become obese adults.

downloadStrong evidence suggests causality between  a decrease in sleep duration and the increase in obesity. Many large studies involving thousands of adults mostly have found that short sleepers (defined as 5 hours or 6 hours less per night) were as much as 45% more likely to be obese. There is not as much data on children, but in one study, it was found that children who sleep less than 7.5 hours per night had a threefold greater risk of becoming obese over a five-year period.

vending-machine-for-snacks“Studies also demonstrate that short sleepers don’t eat healthfully. Overall, their alcoholdiets have less food variety, a greater percentage of calories from snacks, and higher amounts of sugar, caffeine, and alcohol. Furthermore, they tend to skip the main meals (breakfast, lunch, and dinner), and tend to snack more. These habits promote weight gain and the eventual development of obesity,” states Dr. Quan.

Dr. Quan goes on to say, “Experimental studies indicate that sleep restriction leads to abnormalities in the processing of blood sugar (glucose) and changes in hormones that control appetite. For example, the hormone ghrelin stimulates appetite, whereas the hormone leptin reduces it. With sleep restriction, levels of ghrelin rise and those of leptin fall, thus leading to an increase in hunger and appetite. Additionally, these studies have observed that sleep-restricted individuals have a greater desire for high-calorie, high-carbohydrate foods.”

“The take-home message is that getting enough sleep is one way to lower your risk for weight gain and obesity. There is a tendency to put on pounds, as one grows older. Inadequate sleep will only worsen this trend. If a person is already overweight or obese, weight loss will be more difficult without adequate sleep. From a societal perspective, the obesity epidemic, with its associated increases in the rates of several chronic conditions (e.g., heart disease, diabetes), places a greater burden on the health care system and contributes to rising health care costs. Adequate sleep deserves to be included with exercise and good nutrition as one of the essentials of good health.” (Quan, 2015)

Dear readers, if you have read this far, the Captain would be most heartened if you would rate this and future articles and/or leave a comment at the top of the blog posts whether positive or negative. In this way, “The Fat Bastard Gazette” may better serve you and our entire readership.


Quan, S. M. (2015, October 7). Too little sleep and too much weight: a dangerous duo. Retrieved October 13, 2015, from Harvard Health Publications Harvard Medical School: http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/too-little-sleep-and-too-much-weight-a-dangerous-duo-201510078396?utm_source=SilverpopMailing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=10.09.2015%20(1)

Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon
Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner, and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon with Sam Borsalino, Assistant Publisher

Dear Hail-Fellows well met, “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is written and edited by your favorite curmudgeons Captain Hank Quinlan and

Flatfoot Willie, Corespondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers
Flatfoot Willie, Correspondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers

Staff (monkeys in the back room). We offer an ongoing tirade to support or offend anyone of any large dimension, cultural background, religious affiliation, or color of skin. This gazette rails against an eclectic mix of circus ring ne’er do wells, big ring fatty and fatso whiners, congenital idiots, the usual motley assortment of the profoundly dumbfounded, and a favorite of intelligent men everywhere, the

May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity .
May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity.

“Great Booboisie.” Nor shall we ignore the wide assortment of shirkers, layabouts, and slugabeds.

Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.
Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.

All this and more always keeping our major focus on “Why so fat?”  Enough said? We at “The Fat Bastard Gazette” think so. If you like what you read, and you know whom you are, in this yellow blog, tell your friends. We would be elated with an ever-wider readership. We remain cordially yours, Captain Hank Quinlan and the Monkeys in the back room

“The Fat Bastard Gazette” does not purport to offer any definitive medical or pharmaceutical advice whatsoever in any explicit or implied manner. Always consult a qualified physician in all medical or pharmaceutical matters. “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is only the opinion of informed nonprofessionals for the general edification and entertainment of the greater public. 

No similarities to any existing names or characters are expressed or implied. We reserve the right to offend or support anybody, anything, or any sacred totem across the globe.

MUSCADINE GRAPE SEED OIL MAY HELP IN WEIGHT REDUCTION Vol. 1 No. 63


benefits-of-muscadine-grapes-wines-and-nutraceuticalsMuscadine grape seed oil supplies a form of Vitamin E, giving scientists another clue to reducing obesity, a new University of Florida study shows.

The oil may help mitigate the formation of new fat cells because it produces tocotrienol, an unsaturated form of Vitamin E, said Marty Marshall, a UF professor of food science and human nutrition.

supreme_hand“Thus, consuming foods made with muscadine grape seed oil could curtail weight gain by reducing obesity,” Marshall said.

Post-RMusc-WebMuscadine grape seed oil would be a valuable addition to the market of edible oils because it is a unique source of tocotrienol in addition to being a good source of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids, Marshall said. In addition, scientists anticipate that muscadine grape seed oils fortified with additional tocotrienol from underutilized muscadine varieties could be developed to help stem obesity.

Vitacost-Muscadine-Grape-Seed-835003007301Before this study, scientists attributed most tocotrienol benefits to red palm and rice bran oil. In fact, recent studies have shown that rice bran oil helps lower cholesterol. With the new findings, muscadine grape seed oil could be considered a superior source of tocotrienol, said Marshall, a faculty member at UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.

But first, scientists must figure out how to help growers produce large quantities of it. They also must figure out how consumers will use the oil. Salad dressings come to mind, Marshall said.

For the study, published online in the journal Food and Function, scientists took muscadine grapes grown near Tallahassee and, working in a UF/IFAS lab, extracted oil from the fruit’s seeds. They found the content of unsaturated fatty acids reached 85 to 90 percent of the total fatty acids.

VITro78a_webMuscadine grapes – with thick skin and large seeds – grow in the South and are used to make wine and juice. Each year, thousands of tons of the solid byproduct pomace emerge after wine and grape juice production. Traditionally, most of the pomace goes to landfills as waste. But some wineries use the muscadine grape seeds for oil. Some of it even shows up in specialty stores, Marshall said.

“Our interest has been to find a value-added capability of these waste streams,” he said, adding that this may be another use for the grape “waste.”

In previous studies, Marshall and his colleagues focused on antioxidants in grape skins.

Adapted by  ” The Fat Bastard Gazette”  from original media release


Buck, B. (2015, June 29). Muscadine grape seed oil may help reduce obesity, study shows. Retrieved June 30, 2015, from UF News University of Florida: http://news.ufl.edu/archive/2015/06/muscadine-grape-seed-oil-may-help-reduce-obesity-study-shows.html

Muscadine grape seed oil as a novel source of tocotrienols to reduce adipogenesis and adipocyte inflammation, Lu Zhao, Yavuz Yagiz, Changmou Xu, Jiang Lu, Soonkyu Chung and Maurice R. Marshall, Food and Function, doi: 10.1039/C5FO00261C, published online 5 June 2015.

Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon
Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner, and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon with Sam Borsalino, Assistant Publisher

Dear Hail-Fellows well met, “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is written and edited by your favorite curmudgeons Captain Hank Quinlan and

Flatfoot Willie, Corespondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers
Flatfoot Willie, Correspondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers

Staff (monkeys in the back room). We offer an ongoing tirade to support or offend anyone of any large dimension, cultural background, religious affiliation, or color of skin. This gazette rails against an eclectic mix of circus ring ne’er do wells, big ring fatty and fatso whiners, congenital idiots, the usual motley assortment of the profoundly dumbfounded, and a favorite of intelligent men everywhere, the

May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity .
May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity.

“Great Booboisie.” Nor shall we ignore the wide assortment of shirkers, layabouts, and slugabeds.

Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.
Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.

All this and more always keeping our major focus on “Why so fat?”  Enough said? We at “The Fat Bastard Gazette” think so. If you like what you read, and you know whom you are, in this yellow blog, tell your friends. We would be elated with an ever-wider readership. We remain cordially yours, Captain Hank Quinlan and the Monkeys in the back room

“The Fat Bastard Gazette” does not purport to offer any definitive medical or pharmaceutical advice whatsoever in any explicit or implied manner. Always consult a qualified physician in all medical or pharmaceutical matters. “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is only the opinion of informed nonprofessionals for the general edification and entertainment of the greater public. 

No similarities to any existing names or characters are expressed or implied. We reserve the right to offend or support anybody, anything, or any sacred totem across the globe.