THE WEIGHT OF REJECTION LOOMS LARGE FOR HEAVIER INDIVIDUALS.


 

keep-calm-and-come-speed-datingImagine oneself in this scenario. You are in a speed dating situation with only 5 minutes to find favor with, or not, the individual on the opposite side of the table from you. It can be unnerving enough for the most confident of individuals. For heavier women the effects are even worse. A study shows that reservations about rejection and devaluation in reference to one’s weight can lead down the path to the deleterious health consequences.

major-brenda_150x200
Dr. Brenda Major is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the University of California, Santa Barbara.
blodorn_150x200
Dr. Alison Blodorn is a post-doctoral research associate working with Dr. Brenda Major in the Self & Social Identity Lab at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Two UC Santa Barbara psychologists set out to examine whether and how the anticipation of rejection — versus the actual experience of it — affects an individual’s emotional well-being. Dr. Brenda Major is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the University of California, Santa Barbara and Brenda Major devised a study that measured the effects of anticipated rejection caused by weight-stigmatizing situations — like dating. The results, they discovered, depended on participants’ weight and gender. The findings appear in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology (Cohen, 2016).

“We experimentally tested whether the mere anticipation of rejection among heavier individuals is enough to lead to downstream negative psychological effects such as decreased self-esteem or feelings of self-consciousness,” explained Blodorn, a postdoctoral research associate in the Self & Social Identity Lab in UCSB’s Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences.

The researchers enlisted 160 men and women of differing body weights, aged 18 to 29, who identified themselves as heterosexual. Each individual in the study was asked to give a 5-minute talk detailing why he or she would make a viable dating partner. They were told a comely member of the opposite sex would evaluate the speech.

Half of the participants in the study were told that the evaluator would see a video recording of their speeches, so their weight would be self-evident. For the other half of the study group, evaluators would only hear the audio portion of the speeches so weight was not a factor in the decision-making process.

speed-dating-pegsTo assess anticipated rejection, immediately before giving their speeches participants were asked to rate, how likely they thought their evaluators would be to accept them or to reject them. After their speeches were recorded, participants completed a variety of tests to measure levels of self-esteem, feelings of self-consciousness such as shame and embarrassment, and stress emotions like anxiety and discomfort. Participants’ height and weight were also measured in order to calculate their body mass index (BMI) (Cohen, 2016). “Heavier women — or those with a higher BMI — who thought their weight would be seen expected to be rejected by their evaluator,” Blodorn explained. “This anticipated rejection led to lower self-esteem, greater feelings of self-consciousness and greater stress.”

She noted that the same conditions that were detrimental to heavier women had the opposite effect for thinner women who saw their weight as an asset. “Thinner women expected to be accepted and this led to increased feelings of positive self-esteem, decreased self-consciousness and less stress,” Blodorn said. “It’s not too surprising, given that thinness and beauty are so intertwined in our society.”

paper-bag-speed-datingThe results differed for men. “Interestingly, we didn’t see any of the same negative effects for heavier men,” Blodorn said. “They didn’t expect to be rejected by an attractive female who was going to rate their dating potential when their weight was fully seen. It’s possible that these findings are limited to the dating domain, and more research needs to be done before we could say heavier men are not affected by weight stigma.”

The study implies, relative to heavy women, that direct confrontations with negative weight based treatment are not necessary for weight stigma to have adverse effects.

“Even in the absence of actual experiences with negative weight-based treatment, anticipated rejection can lead to negative psychological health,” Blodorn said. “Given that weight bias is so pervasive in our society, these findings have huge implications for the psychological well-being of heavier women.”

“It seems inevitable that in a slew of different situations — such as going to the grocery store or gym — they are going to be worried about being rejected or evaluated unfavorably due to their weight,” she concluded. “And this can lead to long-term decreases in well-being.”

 

 

Cohen, J. (2016, March 21). The Weight of Rejection. Retrieved March 24, 2016, from The UC Santa Barbara Current: http://www.news.ucsb.edu/2016/016570/weight-rejection

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POOR DIET, LACK OF EXERCISE HASTENS THE ONSET OF AGE-RELATED CONDITIONS IN MICE AND MEN.


images (2)An unhealthy diet and living the life of a coach potato may be making you age faster. Researchers at Mayo Clinic believe there is a link between these modifiable lifestyle factors and the biological processes of aging. In a recent study, researchers demonstrated that a poor diet and lack of exercise accelerated the onset of cellular senescence ( the process of aging) and, in turn, age-related conditions in mice. Results appear in the March issue of Diabetes  (Forliti, 2016).

images (4)Senescent cells contribute to various diseases and conditions joined with age. Researchers from the Mayo Clinic Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging discovered that exercise deters premature senescent cell accumulation and as a prophylactic against the harmful effects of an unhealthy diet including but not limited to deficits in physical, heart, and metabolic function, equal to diabetes.

Nathan K. LeBrasseur, M.S., Ph.D.
Nathan K. LeBrasseur, M.S., Ph.D.

“We think at both a biological level and a clinical level, poor nutrition choices and inactive lifestyles do accelerate aging,” says Nathan LeBrasseur, Ph.D., director of the Center on Aging’s Healthy and Independent Living Program and senior author of the study. “So now we’ve shown this in very fine detail at a cellular level, and we can see it clinically. And people need to remember that even though you don’t have the diagnosis of diabetes or the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease or the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease today when you’re in midlife, the biology underlying those processes is hard at work.”

Junk_food_2While the deleterious effects of the fast-food diet were readily apparent, researchers found noticeable health improvements after the mice began to exercise. Half the mice, among which were on both healthful and unhealthful diets, were given exercise wheels. The mice that ate a fast food diet but exercised displayed suppression in body weight gain and fat mass accumulation; they were protected against the buildup of senescent cells. The mice petit healthful, normal diet also benefited from exercise.

MULTIMEDIA ALERT: Video is available for download on the Mayo Clinic News Network. https://youtu.be/SRqmxfwf9aI

“Some of us believe that aging is just something that happens to all of us and it’s just a predestined fate, and by the time I turn 65 or 70 or 80, I will have Alzheimer’s disease and cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis,” says Dr. LeBrasseur. “And this clearly shows the importance of modifiable factors so healthy diet, and even more so, just the importance of regular physical activity. So that doesn’t mean that we need to be marathon runners, but we need to find ways to increase our habitual activity levels to stay healthy and prevent processes that drive aging and aging-related diseases.”

The research was supported by the Paul F. Glenn Foundation for Medical Research, the National Institutes of Health, the Pritzker Foundation, and Robert and Arlene Kogod.

Others on the research team include Marissa Schafer, Ph.D.; Thomas White, Ph.D.; Glenda Evans; Jason Tonne; Grace Verzosa, M.D.; Michael Stout, Ph.D.; Daniel Mazula; Allyson Palmer; Darren Baker, Ph.D.; Michael Jensen, M.D.; Michael Torbenson, M.D.; Jordan Miller, Ph.D.; Yasuhiro Ikeda, Ph.D.; Tamar Tchkonia. Ph.D.; Jan van Deursen, Ph.D.; James Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D., all of Mayo Clinic.

Mayo Clinic and Dr. Tchkonia, Palmer, Dr. Kirkland and Dr. LeBrasseur have a financial interest related to this research.

 

 

Forliti, M. (2016, March 16). Poor Diet, Lack of Exercise Accelerate Onset of Age-Related Conditions in Mice. Retrieved March 21, 2016, from Mayo Clinic News Network: http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/poor-diet-and-lack-of-exercise-accelerate-the-onset-of-age-related-conditions-in-mice/

 

Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon
Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner, and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon with Sam Borsalino, Assistant Publisher

Dear Hail-Fellows well met, “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is written and edited by your favorite curmudgeons Captain Hank Quinlan and

Flatfoot Willie, Corespondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers
Flatfoot Willie, Correspondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers

Staff (monkeys in the back room). We offer an ongoing tirade to support or offend anyone of any large dimension, cultural background, religious affiliation, or color of skin. This gazette rails against an eclectic mix of circus ring ne’er do wells, big ring fatty and fatso whiners, congenital idiots, the usual motley assortment of the profoundly dumbfounded, and a favorite of intelligent men everywhere, the

May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity .
May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity.

“Great Booboisie.” Nor shall we ignore the wide assortment of shirkers, layabouts, and slugabeds.

Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.
Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.

All this and more always keeping our major focus on “Why so fat?”  Enough said? We at “The Fat Bastard Gazette” think so. If you like what you read, and you know whom you are, in this yellow blog, tell your friends. We would be elated with an ever-wider readership. We remain cordially yours, Captain Hank Quinlan and the Monkeys in the back room

“The Fat Bastard Gazette” does not purport to offer any definitive medical or pharmaceutical advice whatsoever in any explicit or implied manner. Always consult a qualified physician in all medical or pharmaceutical matters. “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is only the opinion of informed nonprofessionals for the general edification and entertainment of the greater public. 

 No similarities to any existing names or characters are expressed or implied. We reserve the right to offend or support anybody, anything, or any sacred totem across the globe.

A 5% WEIGHT-LOSS MAKES A BIG DIFFERENCE IN YOUR HEALTH PROFILE.


Medical_complications_of_obesity
Medical complications of obesity. Click to enlarge

Greater than one in three Americans are obese. Obesity is a looming risk factor for a variety of diseases, two diseases being type 2 diabetes and heart disease. These health problems stem from a wide range of underlying medical abnormalities that affect the liver, pancreas, muscle, fat, and other tissues.

Current treatment guidelines suggest a 5% to 10% weight reduction in people that are overweight or obese to bring about any noticeable improvements in health. Team leader, Dr. Samuel Klein, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and his team studied the metabolic benefits of a 5% weight-loss in obese subjects. NIH’s National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), and other NIH constituents funded this study.

downloadThe scientists randomly assigned 40 sedentary people with obesity to maintain their body weight or to go on a diet to lose 5% of their body weight, followed by targets of 10% and 15%. Participants averaged 44 years of age with a body mass index (BMI) of 38 (average weight of about 235 pounds). The participants did not smoke or have diabetes. The findings appeared online on February 22, 2016, in Cell Metabolism (Torgan, 2016).

Subjects in the weight-loss group ate a low-calorie diet: 50%-55% of the energy supplied was in the form of carbohydrate, 30% as fat, and 15%-20% as protein. Participants were provided with weekly diets and behavioral education sessions.

download (1)Nineteen individuals reached the initial target range of 5% weight-loss, an average of 12 pounds, after about 3 ½ months. The researchers discovered that this crew had greatly decreased body fat, which included the abdominal fat and fat in the liver. Moreover, they had decreased blood plasma levels of glucose, insulin, triglycerides, and leptin, which are the telltale risk factors for heart disease and diabetes. These individuals showed an improved function of insulin-secreting beta cells found in the pancreas, as well as increased sensitivity of fat, liver, and muscle tissue to insulin.

Biomarkers of inflammation are increased in people with obesity. However, the scientists found no changes in systemic or fat tissue biomarkers of inflammation with subjects having a 5% weight-loss.

fast-weight-loss-tips-for-menNine individuals reached the succeeding targets having reached an approximate weight loss of 11% in about seven months and a 16% weight-loss at about 10 months. The decreases in fat mass, blood plasma insulin, leptin, and triglyceride concentrations continued in concert with the weight-loss. Continued improvements in beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity in muscle was seen in these individuals. Insulin sensitivity in the liver and fat tissue was not significant with weight-loss greater than 5%.

“Our findings demonstrate that you get the biggest bang for your buck with 5% weight loss,” Klein says. “If you weigh 200 pounds, you will be doing yourself a favor if you can lose 10 pounds and keep it off. You don’t have to lose 50 pounds to get important health benefits.”

This study did not ascertain whether these effects are maintained for further periods. More research is needed to determine if individuals with diabetes have the same types and patterns of metabolic adjustment following increasing weight-loss as in this study.

 

 

Torgan, C. (2016, March 3). Benefits of moderate weight loss in people with obesity. Retrieved March 17, 2016, from NIH RESEARCH MATTERS: http://www.nih.gov/news-events/nih-research-matters/benefits-moderate-weight-loss-people-obesity

Effects of Moderate and Subsequent Progressive Weight Loss on Metabolic Function and Adipose Tissue Biology in Humans with Obesity. Magkos F, Fraterrigo G, Yoshino J, Luecking C, Kirbach K, Kelly SC, de Las Fuentes L, He S, Okunade AL, Patterson BW, Klein S. Cell Metab. 2016 Feb 22. pii: S1550-4131(16)30053-5. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2016.02.005. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 26916363.

 

 

Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon
Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner, and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon with Sam Borsalino, Assistant Publisher

Dear Hail-Fellows well met, “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is written and edited by your favorite curmudgeons Captain Hank Quinlan and

Flatfoot Willie, Corespondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers
Flatfoot Willie, Correspondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers

Staff (monkeys in the back room). We offer an ongoing tirade to support or offend anyone of any large dimension, cultural background, religious affiliation, or color of skin. This gazette rails against an eclectic mix of circus ring ne’er do wells, big ring fatty and fatso whiners, congenital idiots, the usual motley assortment of the profoundly dumbfounded, and a favorite of intelligent men everywhere, the

May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity .
May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity.

“Great Booboisie.” Nor shall we ignore the wide assortment of shirkers, layabouts, and slugabeds.

Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.
Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.

All this and more always keeping our major focus on “Why so fat?”  Enough said? We at “The Fat Bastard Gazette” think so. If you like what you read, and you know whom you are, in this yellow blog, tell your friends. We would be elated with an ever-wider readership. We remain cordially yours, Captain Hank Quinlan and the Monkeys in the back room

“The Fat Bastard Gazette” does not purport to offer any definitive medical or pharmaceutical advice whatsoever in any explicit or implied manner. Always consult a qualified physician in all medical or pharmaceutical matters. “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is only the opinion of informed nonprofessionals for the general edification and entertainment of the greater public. 

 No similarities to any existing names or characters are expressed or implied. We reserve the right to offend or support anybody, anything, or any sacred totem across the globe.

THE BRIGHT AND DARK SIDE OF CALORIC RESTRICTION FOR AGING AND HEALTH


It is old news that diet may have a life-extending effect. Researchers from Leibniz Institute on Aging – Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI) in Jena, Germany, show that on the one hand stem-cell function is improved in mice by caloric restriction, but also leads to a fatal weakening of their immune system. This fatal weakening contracts the life-lengthening effect of diet delete. The results are published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

A few years ago, scientists were successful in extending the life span of a worm, fruit fly, and rats approximately 50% by initiating a simple caloric restriction. This finding immediately gave hope of having found one key to a longer life for humans. When these results were transferred, to long-lived primates shortly after, it was not equally successful

Karl Lenhard Rudolph, Scientific Director at the Leibniz Institute on Aging – Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI)
Karl Lenhard Rudolph, Scientific Director at the Leibniz Institute on Aging – Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI)

and enthusiasm waned. A scientist on aging Karl Lenhard Rudolph, Scientific Director at the Leibniz Institute on Aging – Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI) in Jena, Germany, and his team went on to show, “that caloric restriction even has a severe downside. In feeding experiments, the stem cells of mice, which were set on a diet, were found to age slower – but the murine immune system was almost completely cut down. Outside of optimal, sterile laboratory conditions, this could lead to severe live-shortening infections” (Kästner, 2016). The results of the study are published in the March 7, 2016, issue of the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

This study specifically focused on the effects of calorie restriction on blood stem cells. The stem cells are responsible for making red blood cells or lymphocytes (immune cells). As in any other adult stem cell, blood cell functionality decreases with every single cell division, the stem cells age. This is why they stay in a resting phase called quiescence most of the time. Stem cells are only activated when a massive cell reproduction is required, for example after great blood loss.

eatless.miceIn this study, researchers investigated how only a 30% food restriction affects stem cell aging in mice. One main result was that the red blood stem cells remained quiescent even as simulated stress would have required their activation. Diet duration had no effect. The upside of all this was that blood stem cells did not age in their functionality to make new blood cells remained as strong as ever even one year after diet.

The downside of the long-term diet evidenced the mice’s immune system was almost completely shut down. The diet had no strong effect on the overall blood cell count but the production of lymphocytes (immune cells), needed for immune defense, and decreased by up to 75%. Consequently, the mice were severely prone to bacterial infections.

Prof. Dr. Michael Bauer Principal Investigator Center for Sepsis Control and Care and Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Jena University Hospital
Prof. Dr. Michael Bauer
Principal Investigator
Center for Sepsis Control and Care and Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Jena University Hospital

“The study provides the first experimental evidence that long-term caloric restriction – as intervention to slow down aging – increases stem cell functionality, but results in immune defects in the context of prolonged bacterial infection, too. Thus, positive effects of a diet are not transferable to humans one to one,” Rudolph sums up the study results. Even if – under laboratory conditions – aging of single cells or tissues may be slowed down through a diet, the immune suppression may have fatal consequences in real life. To benefit from caloric restriction or medicinal mimetika aiming at increasing health in the elderly, possible risks of such interventions to come down with life-threatening infections remain to be elucidated. “In sepsis patients, we see a higher survival rate for those with a higher body mass than for patients who are very lean,” Prof. Dr. Michael Bauer, Director of the Center for Sepsis Control and Care at University Hospital Jena (UKJ), concurs (Kästner, 2016).

 

 

Dietary restriction improves repopulation but impairs lymphoid differentiation capacity of hematopoietic stem cells in early aging, Tang D, Tao S, Chen Z, Koliesnik IO, Gebert N, Calmes PG, Hörr V, Löffler B, Morita Y, Rudolph KL, Journal of Experimental Medicine, doi: 10.1084/jem.20151100, published 7 March 2016.

Kästner, D. E. (2016, March 14). THE UP AND DOWN SIDE OF CALORIC RESTRICTION FOR AGING AND HEALTH. Retrieved March 15, 2016, from fli Leibniz Institute on Aging – Fritz Lipmann Institute: http://www.leibniz-fli.de/nc/institute/public-relations/detailpage/?tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=2510&cHash=7d5cbe951317dc513959534631b4def2

 

 

Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon
Captain Hank Quinlan, Owner, and Publisher, Chief Curmudgeon with Sam Borsalino, Assistant Publisher

Dear Hail-Fellows well met, “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is written and edited by your favorite curmudgeons Captain Hank Quinlan and

Flatfoot Willie, Corespondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers
Flatfoot Willie, Correspondent at Large with fellow Staff Writers

Staff (monkeys in the back room). We offer an ongoing tirade to support or offend anyone of any large dimension, cultural background, religious affiliation, or color of skin. This gazette rails against an eclectic mix of circus ring ne’er do wells, big ring fatty and fatso whiners, congenital idiots, the usual motley assortment of the profoundly dumbfounded, and a favorite of intelligent men everywhere, the

May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity .
May the Most Venerable H. L. Mencken bless our unworthy but earnest attempts at tongue in cheek jocularity.

“Great Booboisie.” Nor shall we ignore the wide assortment of shirkers, layabouts, and slugabeds.

Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.
Latest office staff confab at Fat Bastard HQ.

All this and more always keeping our major focus on “Why so fat?”  Enough said? We at “The Fat Bastard Gazette” think so. If you like what you read, and you know whom you are, in this yellow blog, tell your friends. We would be elated with an ever-wider readership. We remain cordially yours, Captain Hank Quinlan and the Monkeys in the back room

“The Fat Bastard Gazette” does not purport to offer any definitive medical or pharmaceutical advice whatsoever in any explicit or implied manner. Always consult a qualified physician in all medical or pharmaceutical matters. “The Fat Bastard Gazette” is only the opinion of informed nonprofessionals for the general edification and entertainment of the greater public. 

 No similarities to any existing names or characters are expressed or implied. We reserve the right to offend or support anybody, anything, or any sacred totem across the globe.